“I Can Make That Myself”: Laundry Detergent

IMG_1052

I’m not sure how long ago I first heard about someone making their own laundry soap, but it sounded so simple — and so cheap — it just made sense to try it. When my friend Kristina posted on our photo blog that she had tried it, the idea seemed even more credible. But then school and work and moving and life in general kept me so busy that every time I reached the end of a detergent bottle, it was just easier to grab a new one from the grocery store and tell myself that maybe I would try making my own after that one.

With life settling down a bit since graduation and our move (and my success with making my own dishwasher detergent), though, I became even more determined than ever that I need to try making my own laundry soap. This week, with my last bottle of laundry detergent balanced upside down to let gravity pull down the final drops, I decided that now was the time.

In typical fashion, I researched a variety of recipes and read through pages of comments, perusing arguments about the pros and cons of each recipe, method, and ingredient until I began to second-guess the whole idea.
In the end, though, I settled on a small batch of powdered laundry soap to try it out (rather than the five-gallon bucket of liquid laundry soap). I started with this recipe, but ended up adding the rest of the bar of soap after noticing how much more soap other recipes called for in proportion to the borax and super washing soda.

IMG_1042

DIY Powdered Laundry Soap

2 cups Borax
2 cups Super Washing Soda
1 bar of Dr. Bronners soap (I used the citrus scent)

1. Grate the bar of soap, using the food processor (you can also do this by hand, but several reviews I read suggested that the food processor makes it finer and therefore easier to dissolve, even in cold water)

2. Add the Borax and Super Washing Soda to the food processor and process until fine.

3. Store in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Use 1/4 – 1/8 cup per load.

IMG_1049

I have only done laundry once since making this, but so far it seems to be working well. The clothes smell clean (though I can’t smell the citrus of the soap) and don’t seem to have any residue.

About these ads
Next Post
Leave a comment

2 Comments

  1. Wendy Kennedy

     /  August 28, 2013

    I’m glad you tried this first- it’s been on my list, too! Question: in your research, did you read anything about using this in front loaders? Also- does it HAVE to be Dr. Bronner’s Soap? I’ve never seen it around here (of course, I’ve never looked, either!)

    Reply
    • I know it said it’s okay for High Efficiency washers (because it doesn’t make suds) — is that the same thing?

      I don’t think it has to be Dr. Bronner’s Soap (I used that because it’s a natural soap — I found it at a health food store near us and somebody said Target carries it, though I haven’t looked). A lot of the recipes called for Fels Naptha soap, which can usually be found in the laundry aisle (I think it’s specifically a “laundry soap” in bar form). I think the comments on the recipe I linked gives some other options, too. I think you just have to be careful of using soaps that have too many oils or that would be too harsh on clothes

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 49 other followers

%d bloggers like this: